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shrinkinglibrarian:

“The gay penguins that ruffled feathers in Loudoun County school libraries and became the darlings of gay rights advocates and intellectual freedom fighters everywhere have taken to the stage. A play that premiered in Fairfax this summer at the Hub Theatre is based on a controversial children’s book about Roy and Silo, the real-life male penguins who hatched and raised a chick together at the Central Park Zoo. The play chronicles their family life, their rise to stardom and, as one character describes it, ‘the bird-brained behavior they caused.’”

(via Library Stuff)

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Following up on yesterday’s Banned Books Week post:

South Park: The Tale of Scrotie McBoogerballs
Original Air Date: 03.24.2010

The boys are given one of the most notably banned books of all time as a reading assignment. They eagerly dive in, but soon find it doesnt compare to their standard of what’s vulgar. Annoyed for having their time wasted by reading, they write an obscene book of their own to show that they can do it better. But when their parents discover their work, the boys throw all the blame to Butters, inadvertently turning him into a critically acclaimed author.

Really, only the first quarter or so is of direct interest to us banned-books-week-loving types, but the rest of the episode is good, too. Although - if you can’t handle cartoons vomiting, then I would stop after the “But when their parents discover their work” part. Happy watching!

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nerdylikearockstar:

This year’s display! I’ve fallen in love with removable labels from DEMCO. The top is the adult display; each book has a label with a bright red slash/circle (what are those things called?) with some of the reasons the book was challenged or banned. This is the question we get asked the most—particularly when someone finds a classic or a beloved book. I got all of that information from the ALA website and the 2007 Banned Books Week Sourcebook. The close-up is LOTR which was burned with many other books for being “satanic”.

This year I kept the YA display separate, to encourage people to browse the books with the intent to check them out (which I think is easier when they’re browsing their reading level). For the teen books I went for a more provocative “Are you brave enough to read a banned book?” and a modification of the message from last year.

So, are you brave enough to read a banned book?

(via hannahlmr-deactivated20120706)

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(Source: perfumeofsighs)

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sallyella:

I’d be really interested to see England’s list. I find banned books so interesting.

(via madhatsally-deactivated20120809)

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sooo cute! love it.

sooo cute! love it.

(via moviesandmusicandbooksohmy)

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