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Billed as a playground for language, the Bowery Poetry Club extends a welcoming hand to youngsters who love words with the Bowery Kids series of kid-friendly shows and readings.

The cafe here serves soup, sandwiches, wraps, salads, and fresh pastries and desserts. Vox Pop provides a special menu just for Bowery Kids shows, which includes The Dr. Seuss, a green smoothie with bananas, mangoes, honey, and organic milk ($4.50); The Mister Rogers, peanut butter and jelly on white or whole wheat toast, and The Jabberwocky, a banana, honey, and peanut butter sandwich, on wheat or white bread - both with the edges cut off ($3 each); and The Puppy Dog, a vegan hot dog served with ketchup and carrot sticks ($3).

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From what I can tell, this exhibit is still up. (Maybe call first?) So if you’re in Denver… check it out.

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Fairies, Witches and Supply and Demand | NYTimes.com

Even advanced concepts, like organized labor, show up in children’s literature. Justin Wolfers, a professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, cited “Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type” by Doreen Cronin and Betsy Lewin, a book about cows that withhold milk from a farmer until he provides electric blankets. Mr. Wolfers read the book to his 1-year-old daughter, Matilda, during the Wisconsin protests against Gov. Scott Walker’s attack on union rights.

I thought that was cute.

Fairies, Witches and Supply and Demand | NYTimes.com

I recommend. Very interesting article.

Although - something seems off about it, especially the Lorax part. I think that particular economist just misses the point of The Lorax altogether. I always thought that the story questioned ideas of capitalism and the entire notion of property/land ownership.

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book-aesthete:

The elusive first printing of The King’s Stilts, one of the rarest editions of a Dr. Seuss book in the trade. Inscription reads; “For testimonial on excellence of Mr. Calvin’s Services, see Special Folder. -Dr. Seuss.” 
via Rare Book Review

book-aesthete:

The elusive first printing of The King’s Stilts, one of the rarest editions of a Dr. Seuss book in the trade. Inscription reads; “For testimonial on excellence of Mr. Calvin’s Services, see Special Folder. -Dr. Seuss.”

via Rare Book Review

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"Cohen, who notes that there are some 30 stories from Geisel’s “magazine period,” explains that the selections in The Bippolo Seed mark a pivotal transitional point in the author’s career. “This is Dr. Seuss exactly when he was becoming Dr. Seuss,” he says. “From a chance encounter with a three-year-old who couldn’t yet read but had memorized his Thidwick the Big-Hearted Moose, Geisel had realized the importance of using rhyme as a read-aloud, auditory experience. He’d observed German and Japanese children reared on propaganda during World War II and began to realize that, instead of that negative influence, he had a skill that could make a positive difference. He started writing with the rhythm and rhyme for which he’s now known, and it tickles me to see the way that style and his expertise develop in this story collection, and to know that others will now be able to appreciate and enjoy it, too.”"

Random House to Publish Lost Dr. Seuss Stories | Publishers Weekly

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BuzzFeed + Dr. Seuss = Love

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I love comprehensive list-blogs like this. Their description: A Compendium of Children’s Books by Twentieth Century ‘Adult’ Authors Currently Out of Print

Includes a ton of great authors, from Andy Warhold to Arna Bontomps to Theo LeSieg to Toni Morrison.

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jessjesspandabear:

Love♥
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slacktory:

11 Ragetoon Editions of Classic Kids’ Books
A brilliant collection by Jed Stoneham. While my personal favorite is Strega Nona, I think Green Eggs and Ham is the crowdpleaser.

slacktory:

11 Ragetoon Editions of Classic Kids’ Books

A brilliant collection by Jed Stoneham. While my personal favorite is Strega Nona, I think Green Eggs and Ham is the crowdpleaser.

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verykwality:

This Beijing bookstore, designed for Poplar, Japan’s largest children’s book publisher, has rivers of rainbows, hidey holes to read in, and mountains to climb, and basically looks like a Dr. Seuss book come to life. What more could a kid ask for?

verykwality:

This Beijing bookstore, designed for Poplar, Japan’s largest children’s book publisher, has rivers of rainbows, hidey holes to read in, and mountains to climb, and basically looks like a Dr. Seuss book come to life. What more could a kid ask for?

(Source: seriesofnumbersandletters)

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Seuss Snow Day Surprise!

I always get a weird look whenever I tell people that Dr. Seuss is my favorite painter - but his little known “fine art” is really, really fantastic! Check out his Secret Art” collection, read some background on his non-illustrative art, and check out this nifty window into The Secret Art of Dr. Seuss, which has a foreword by Maurice Sendak.

originally posted by me (on a snow day!) at http://denisonchildrenslit.blogspot.com/2011/02/seuss-snow-day-surprise.html