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This is so much fun. My favorite mashup was the Nerf commercials’ audio with the Mio Pets commercial’s video.

It’s not a new theoretical discovery or anything, but it’s entertaining - and hey, maybe it could lead to some new realizations.

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My first published scholarly essay, which is very Seuss-ful, will be coming out soon. After reading a gazillion pages of Seuss biography, I can’t help but think he’d be really disappointed by the “THAT’S A WOMAN?” line that I now hear Danny DeVito squawk whenever I try to watch the TV.Of course, I’m no Seuss expert. Most importantly, *I’m* disappointed by this ism-loaded line, and I imagine a lot of other people are aggravated, as well.

My first published scholarly essay, which is very Seuss-ful, will be coming out soon. After reading a gazillion pages of Seuss biography, I can’t help but think he’d be really disappointed by the “THAT’S A WOMAN?” line that I now hear Danny DeVito squawk whenever I try to watch the TV.

Of course, I’m no Seuss expert. Most importantly, *I’m* disappointed by this ism-loaded line, and I imagine a lot of other people are aggravated, as well.

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Red Feather is an online, international, interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal that provides a forum for scholars and professionals to interrogate representations of children in film, television, Cyberspace, video gaming or any other visual medium where the image of the child is featured. Visit the “About” link for more information regarding Red Feather’s scope and mission.

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Originally I was going to just reblog Burt’s wonderful quotes from the “Sexy” episode, but I stumbled upon this NYT blog post and wanted to link to the whole thing, since it also links to the Hulu clip (which likely won’t always be available, but w/e), and also because I actually think the first round of reader comments were well-written and spot-on.

…for example: I, along with an early commenter, didn’t like when Holly called Rachel “frigid.” Not how an educator should handle it - it’s her choice, and there are gentler ways to point out that it’s important to have information, whether you choose to use it or not.

Anyway. Was the episode perfect? No, not by any means. But it was miles ahead of any other sex-ed focused episode of a tv show that I’ve seen. And, I decided, very much worth a mention on this blog, especially since the episode was rated “14 and up” and therefore easily qualifies as a Young Adult text. Enjoy!

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As a child, I read because books–violent and not, blasphemous and not, terrifying and not–were the most loving and trustworthy things in my life. I read widely, and loved plenty of the classics so, yes, I recognized the domestic terrors faced by Louisa May Alcott’s March sisters. But I became the kid chased by werewolves, vampires, and evil clowns in Stephen King’s books. I read books about monsters and monstrous things, often written with monstrous language, because they taught me how to battle the real monsters in my life.

And now I write books for teenagers because I vividly remember what it felt like to be a teen facing everyday and epic dangers. I don’t write to protect them. It’s far too late for that. I write to give them weapons–in the form of words and ideas-that will help them fight their monsters. I write in blood because I remember what it felt like to bleed.

WONDERFUL BLOG POST. READ THE WHOLE THING.

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