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peaceloveandbadwords:

kungfucarrie:

mutualaddiction:

feministdisney:

farhaha:

Found these little gems at the front of Pittsburgh’s Barnes &  Noble’s children’s section. Here’s the first page of each. I think I  speak for all women when I say we are THRILLED that society is finally starting to take floristry seriously!

SUBTLE
yet effective at enforcing the gender binary

you’re shitting me right

This should be one GIANT coloring book of all the pages and it should be the KIDS coloring book and ALL THE KIDS (girls, boys, undecided, in-between, outside the gender binary) should get to draw pretty bouquets and invent robots.

Notice how the girl is asked to mimic something already on the page, while the boy is asked to creatively imagine a robot.  Invent instead of draw.  Lovely.  Boys are scientists and girls like pretty things.

Nothing really new to add, except it’s weird that the “girl book” is blue and the “boy book is *almost* pink - did they think they were, like, camouflaging their sexism?

peaceloveandbadwords:

kungfucarrie:

mutualaddiction:

feministdisney:

farhaha:

Found these little gems at the front of Pittsburgh’s Barnes & Noble’s children’s section. Here’s the first page of each.

I think I speak for all women when I say we are THRILLED that society is finally starting to take floristry seriously!

SUBTLE

yet effective at enforcing the gender binary

you’re shitting me right

This should be one GIANT coloring book of all the pages and it should be the KIDS coloring book and ALL THE KIDS (girls, boys, undecided, in-between, outside the gender binary) should get to draw pretty bouquets and invent robots.

Notice how the girl is asked to mimic something already on the page, while the boy is asked to creatively imagine a robot.  Invent instead of draw.  Lovely.  Boys are scientists and girls like pretty things.

Nothing really new to add, except it’s weird that the “girl book” is blue and the “boy book is *almost* pink - did they think they were, like, camouflaging their sexism?

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thelifeguardlibrarian:

Boys and Reading: Is There Any Hope?
Such a timely article, having presented on this topic just last week. Be sure to check out the NYT video featuring James Patterson and Rick Riordan. The best place to learn about boys & reading is from their grown up counterparts.

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Boys and Reading: Is There Any Hope?

Such a timely article, having presented on this topic just last week. Be sure to check out the NYT video featuring James Patterson and Rick Riordan. The best place to learn about boys & reading is from their grown up counterparts.

(via hannahlmr-deactivated20120706)

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(via Explore by Time Period | Zinn Education Project)

Colonization
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Explore by Time Period -
Dozens of downloadable teaching activities, books, films, and websites. Select by dates on the timeline above or era on the menu to the right.

For a more truthful tomorrow.

(via Explore by Time Period | Zinn Education Project)

Explore by Time Period -

Dozens of downloadable teaching activities, books, films, and websites. Select by dates on the timeline above or era on the menu to the right.

For a more truthful tomorrow.

Link

For parents who spent their 20s mooning over “A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius” and intend for their children to read “What Is the What” as soon as they’re globally-sensitive teenagers, there is now an interim means — a baby step? — into Dave Eggers’s literary world.

This month marks the debut of McMullens, a children’s book imprint from Mr. Eggers’s publishing house, McSweeney’s. The project really belongs to the McSweeney’s art director and editor, Brian McMullen, who has two sons under 4. Like many new parents, he found that the experience of having children made him want to write about it — or at least edit other people’s writing about it.

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(via Araboh.com : Educational games, free downloads and Arabic learning for Kids)
Found by way of this blog post on the Araboh website.
Quote
"Ms. Barnes offers reassurance that adult interest in YA is not the result of a crisis in the collective level of literacy in the United States. Rather, it’s indicative of the quality and enduring themes addressed by young adult. “The fluid demographic barrier speaks to the emotional turmoil that makes contemporary young adult literature unique,” she says. “Every decision feels life-changing, and every choice in these books can seem life-or-death. The emotions are no more or less valid than what one might experience at 30, but it’s the first time, and thus very powerful.”"

How Young Adult Fiction Came of Age - D.B. Grady - The Atlantic

Link

“We need to engage children in wanting to learn, wanting to solve problems,” she said. “One way we can interest them is through literature.”

That’s not such a groundbreaking statement when talking about a language arts class, but Assad was specifically referring to something completely different – a mathematics class. She, along with APSU assistant professor of education Dr. Lauren Wells, wants to use children’s literature to boost elementary school students’ science and mathematics comprehension skills, and a new $138,202 grant is helping them do just that.

I’m not a huge fan of this because I am anti-math, but I suppoooose that’s important too. And this is an intriguing idea from a writerly standpoint.

Also, come to think of it, isn’t Magic School Bus largely about problem-solving?

Link

"In summary: he would have been an expert in the field of fisheries, but [Ugandan man] Oscar Katumwa felt he could be of better use to his society if he used his creativity to fight some of the evils like child sacrifice, writes Dennis D. Muhumuza."

From the middle:

Research conducted in over 200 schools in Jinja and Mukono revealed that over 80 per cent of the pupils interviewed believed child sacrifice, and not hard work, is the secret to riches. “It’s alarming that children have been made to believe that the sacrifice of children brings wealth so we use the story of little Viola to change that mindset,” says Katumwa. “The book exposes the harm that child sacrifice causes and contains key facts about child sacrifice and questions to aid recollection and strengthen the child’s understanding of the story. During the reading sessions, we engage children in a discussion that stimulates critical thinking in them. Six schools in Jinja have benefited from this project, and 36 schools more are being targeted before the program is made national.”

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everythingisungodly:

A child’s heartfelt plea to Mayor Bloomberg about cutting library funding.
The whole set of postcards is amazing.

“I’m spelling a lot of stuff wrong. But it will look messy if I cross it out. If he’s a good mayor, he’ll be able to read it.”

everythingisungodly:

A child’s heartfelt plea to Mayor Bloomberg about cutting library funding.

The whole set of postcards is amazing.

“I’m spelling a lot of stuff wrong. But it will look messy if I cross it out. If he’s a good mayor, he’ll be able to read it.”

Video

minusmanhattan:

Christopher Walken reads The Three Little Pigs.

Video

lowleeta:

When artist Raghava KK had two children, he decided it was time for a new approach to children’s books. That approach manifests itself in Pop It, a new children’s book for iPad that looks to teach open mindedness to toddlers.

{via mashable}

I think this is pretty wonderful. I know a good amount of teenagers (and adults for that matter) who could use a little encouragement in the open mindedness department…

another “lgbt children’s book to look out for!”

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seltzerlizard:

via www.iupui.edu