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poor kid. happens to all of us, amirite?

poor kid. happens to all of us, amirite?

(Source: thebrarybunch)

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childrensbooks:

drawnblog:
Wear a helmet (by Matt Forsythe)

childrensbooks:

drawnblog:

Wear a helmet (by Matt Forsythe)

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Fun! From the essay, by Vladimir Radunsky, who also did the illustrations:

Trying to follow Twain’s style, I wanted to make something along the lines of a scrap-book or an album that you could buy in any paper-goods store at the time. Children used these small albums to paste in various curious objects, or for drawing, or just for doodling.

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atlanteandreams:

a book about fake beauty.

PROBLEMATIC

atlanteandreams:

a book about fake beauty.

PROBLEMATIC

(via thenugatorynihilist-deactivated)

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AHHH! This is one of my favorite finds!!!

This is the website for Reach and Teach, “the peace and social justice learning company,” which I just discovered and am currently enamored with. Here’s what’s up:

A page full of socially conscious Puzzles, Games, and Toys

A page full of socially conscious Activities and Coloring Books

A page full of socially conscious BOOKS! that include the following categories:

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Normally I’m not a huge fan of books being marketed for the “lessons” they contain, but this is NPR, so the “lessons” are things like diversity, bullying, death, and cliques… sounds solid to me.

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notime4yourshit:

Nearly eight in ten (78%) U.S. adults believe that it is important for children to be exposed to picture books that feature main characters of various ethnicities or races—but one-third (33%) report that it is difficult to find such books, according to a recent survey that was commissioned by The Ezra Jack Keats Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to enhancing the love of reading and learning in all children.

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realkidsgoodbooks:

How it Feels to be Adopted (1988) by Jill Krementz. 
There are too many stories about adopted kids that play on old cliches. There’s Harry Potter, Despicable Me, Annie, Stuart Little, Hotel for Dogs, even Tarzan. 
Thankfully there’s an antidote to all that, How it Feels to be Adopted by Jill Krementz. This is a book of oral histories of kids who are adopted, how they experience adoption and most importantly how they feel about it. 19 boys and girls from age 8 to 16 share their truths and there is no one cookie cutter approach to what adoption means in each child’s life. This book is required reading if your life is touched by adoption and important for the rest of us to get beyond the reoccurring cliches to the deeper truth. 

realkidsgoodbooks:

How it Feels to be Adopted (1988) by Jill Krementz. 

There are too many stories about adopted kids that play on old cliches. There’s Harry Potter, Despicable Me, Annie, Stuart Little, Hotel for Dogs, even Tarzan. 

Thankfully there’s an antidote to all that, How it Feels to be Adopted by Jill Krementz. This is a book of oral histories of kids who are adopted, how they experience adoption and most importantly how they feel about it. 19 boys and girls from age 8 to 16 share their truths and there is no one cookie cutter approach to what adoption means in each child’s life. This book is required reading if your life is touched by adoption and important for the rest of us to get beyond the reoccurring cliches to the deeper truth. 

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Love Makes a Family

realkidsgoodbooks:

Mommy, Mama and Me   

Daddy, Papa and Me

both by Leslea Newman, illustrated by Carol Thompson.

These board books for the youngest children are so validating for queer families. There is everything you would expect in a board book for this age and yet the message that there are all kinds of families comes shining through. 

this is great! i love this blog, too - i’m going to be recommending it as one of my “other great resources” - or else i’ll end up reblogging everything of yours! keep up the great work!

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This is a concise, great article that pulls together and comments on most areas of the recent WSJ/YASaves activity. And, although it is concise, it’s beautifully written, with relevant information from her own parenting experiences; last, I like it because it rings true with my own beliefs about the issue. From le middle:

I take my kids to the library every week, and I’ve yet to refuse them anything. Frankly, as a parent I’ve always been a much bigger hardass about their exposure to the Disney princess-to-sassymouthed teen juggernaut than anything involving abuse or a dystopian future. My elder girl has read the dark “Tillerman Cycle” books, and her class this year read Lois Lowry’s frequently challenged “The Giver.” And when I asked her what she thought of the WSJ piece this weekend, she rolled her tween eyes and said, “Does she get it that they’re not called ‘children’s’ books? They’re ‘young adult.’ Adult.”