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utilicon:

Alvin Schwartz’s collection of haunting tales Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark is an important gateway drug into the world of the supernatural. And as terrifying as the stories about brides locked forever in an attic trunk truly are, it’s the artwork by Stephen Gammell that kept you up at night.

Are you shitting me? It’s the wicked illustrations that got my 10yr old apathetic ass into reading more books; WTH people?!


Recent outrage in the tumblrverse!

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The silly begins!
Favorite quotes of the night:
"Even just the word ‘looseleaf’ is kind of sexy" - Daniel Handler on note-passing
"Because I think young women are powerful, inherently." - Daniel Handler on his motivation for writing Why We Broke Up and for writing from the perspective of a teenage girl.

The silly begins!

Favorite quotes of the night:

"Even just the word ‘looseleaf’ is kind of sexy" - Daniel Handler on note-passing

"Because I think young women are powerful, inherently." - Daniel Handler on his motivation for writing Why We Broke Up and for writing from the perspective of a teenage girl.

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Book Releases I Am Most Excited About in 2012

aimmyarrowshigh:

(Besides The Panem Companion, which I am in equal parts excited about and made ill thinking about, LOL.)

  • The Blood Journals: The Blood Keeper, Tessa Gratton (??)
  • Across the Universe: A Million Suns, Beth Revis (January 10)
  • The Fault in Our Stars, John Green (January 10)
  • Unearthly: Hallowed, Cynthia Hand (January 17)
  • Delirium: Pandemonium, Lauren Oliver (March 6)
  • The Curse Workers: Black Heart, Holly Black (April 3)
  • The Kane Chronicles #3, Rick Riordan (May 1)
  • The Mortal Instruments: City of Lost Souls, Cassandra Clare (May 8)
  • Paranormalcy: Endlessly, Kiersten White (July 24)
  • The Heroes of Olympus: The Mark of Athena, Rick Riordan (September ??)
  • The Caster Chronicles #4, Kami Garcia & Margaret Stohl (October ??)
  • Isla and the Happily Ever After, Stephanie Perkins (October ??)
  • Matched #3, Ally Condie (November 13)
  • The Infernal Devices: Clockwork Princess, Cassandra Clare (December 1)

I know I’m missing some.  Grargh. 

this individual seems to really know what he/she is talking about…

(Source: aimmyarrowshigh)

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So this was from Jan 10 of last year. Anyone have guesses for what will win this year?

By the way, the above-mentioned book sounds marvelous -

“A young adult novel about a transgender girl—told from the perspective of the straight boy who falls for her—“Almost Perfect” is exceptional. The writing is sensitive, haunting and revelatory,” said Stonewall Children’s and Young Adult Award committee chair Lisa Johnston.

- I definitely want to read it!

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It’s the Huffington Post, buuut it’s still a solid meditation on how time, age, memory, and expectation can affect the experience of re-reading the book.

Interesting - at the end of the blog, he encourages others to share their experiences in re-reading old favorites… and it looks like he’s responded to pretty much everyone’s comments!

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Long-term followers of this blog know that I love to blog/reblog art & writing BY young adults!

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bibliofeminista:

Our novel, Stranger, has five viewpoint characters; one, Yuki Nakamura, is gay and has a boyfriend. Yuki’s romance, like the heterosexual ones in the novel, involves nothing more explicit than kissing.

An agent from a major agency, one which represents a bestselling YA novel in the same genre as ours, called us.

The agent offered to sign us on the condition that we make the gay character straight, or else remove his viewpoint and all references to his sexual orientation.

Rachel replied, “Making a gay character straight is a line in the sand which I will not cross. That is a moral issue. I work with teenagers, and some of them are gay. They never get to read fantasy novels where people like them are the heroes, and that’s not right.”

The agent suggested that perhaps, if the book was very popular and sequels were demanded, Yuki could be revealed to be gay in later books, when readers were already invested in the series.

We knew this was a pie-in-the-sky offer—who knew if there would even be sequels?—and didn’t solve the moral issue. When you refuse to allow major characters in YA novels to be gay, you are telling gay teenagers that they are so utterly horrible that people like them can’t even be allowed to exist in fiction.

LGBTQ teenagers already get told this. They are four times more likely than straight teenagers to attempt suicide. We’re not saying that the absence of LGBTQ teens in YA sf and fantasy novels is the reason for that. But it’s part of the overall social prejudice that does cause that killing despair.

We wrote this novel so that the teenagers we know—some of whom are gay, and many of whom are not white—would be able, for once, to read a fun post-apocalyptic adventure in which they are the heroes. And we were told that such a thing could not be allowed.

This is SO troubling! Props to the authors for speaking out about this since I can’t imagine this is the first time something like this has happened.

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I thought this site looked kind of paparazzi-ish at first, but then i realized it was just MTV.

Anyway, a ton of this Young Adult stuff has been littering up my YA tracked tag, but I picked this one because the comments from the YA authors were actually pretty funny. And contradictory.

Also: PATTON OSWALT!?

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(via A Guide to Over-Analyzing Obama’s Summer Reading List - The Atlantic Wire)
My two cents of over-analysis: not … enough … YA … lit. (Bet you didn’t see that coming.)
Seriously, though, what about Alexie’s Absolutely True Diary or something similar? I guess it’s because Greta van Susteren’s head would have blown up.

(via A Guide to Over-Analyzing Obama’s Summer Reading List - The Atlantic Wire)

My two cents of over-analysis: not … enough … YA … lit. (Bet you didn’t see that coming.)

Seriously, though, what about Alexie’s Absolutely True Diary or something similar? I guess it’s because Greta van Susteren’s head would have blown up.

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"As a secondary English teacher for 42 years, this was yet another affirmation that Alexie’s book was affecting the lives of students, even those not in my classes. Few books have elicited this kind of response from students. Comments from readers ranged from, “This is the first book I’ve ever read,” to, “I’ve been there Mr. D, honest. It’s my life story.”"

Classroom best place for controversial novel - Opinions | Tri-City Herald : Mid-Columbia news

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jmindigo:

(via Kate Hart: Uncovering YA Covers: How Dark Are They?)

re: Meghan Cox Gorden, “way too dark YA fiction,” and #YAsaves. Also important to note: (it’s rumored that) publishers don’t like to print books with white covers because they dirty so easily.

jmindigo:

(via Kate Hart: Uncovering YA Covers: How Dark Are They?)

re: Meghan Cox Gorden, “way too dark YA fiction,” and #YAsaves. Also important to note: (it’s rumored that) publishers don’t like to print books with white covers because they dirty so easily.

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Roundup! Yee-haw. (#1)

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"Ms. Barnes offers reassurance that adult interest in YA is not the result of a crisis in the collective level of literacy in the United States. Rather, it’s indicative of the quality and enduring themes addressed by young adult. “The fluid demographic barrier speaks to the emotional turmoil that makes contemporary young adult literature unique,” she says. “Every decision feels life-changing, and every choice in these books can seem life-or-death. The emotions are no more or less valid than what one might experience at 30, but it’s the first time, and thus very powerful.”"

How Young Adult Fiction Came of Age - D.B. Grady - The Atlantic

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A Bit of a History Lesson: “YA Through the Ages,” by Danya at A Tapestry of Words

These are some great history lessons over at A Tapestry of Words: “YA through the Ages,” she calls them. From her originating post:

Let’s face it: while there may still be “gaps” in YA (see my Find the Gap series), it’s come a long way. I thought I’d do a few posts looking at the progression of YA fiction from its roots to the present — how has it changed? What’s become better? Has anything gotten worse?

So…let’s start at the very beginning. According to Wikipedia (the ultimate source of all knowledge), “young adults” didn’t even technically exist until 1802, when Sarah Trimmer defined “young adulthood” as the age bracket of 14 - 21, and distinguished between “books for children” and “books for young persons.”

It includes posts covering Young Adult Literature in the 1800s, 1900-1950, the 50s, the 60s, the 70s, the 80s, the 90s, and “the 21st century (so far).” Check ‘em out!

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agsoliday:

Luna by Julie Ann Peters, i loved this book. A story about a boy who isnt a boy on the inside. I recommend.

 (lgb)TQ: always reblog.

agsoliday:

Luna by Julie Ann Peters, i loved this book. A story about a boy who isnt a boy on the inside. I recommend.

 (lgb)TQ: always reblog.

(Source: legendaryage)